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Recovery from illness is never a fun road. The past few days have seen me sitting in hostel lobbies, watching everyone around me wander in and out on tours and adventures. I’m glad I waited and mended, because I feel worlds better today, but I’m not sorry I pushed Drew out the door so he could see some of the area while we skipped three days of our walking route.

Yesterday I felt up to a short walk, so we decided to do what turned into a 10km, self-guided scenic tour of the city of Glasgow. I’m sure that there are things we missed, but after seeing an old friend (enemy?) in Waterstones, I couldn’t resist pulling out my camera and making my way through the city streets.

This post could get long and picture-heavy, so I’m going to put the aforementioned picture and the rest behind the cut:

I also hugged him, but he didn’t respond.

So it began. Glasgow’s architecture is beautiful, and while (after a 35km day today that was mostly up and down the same street simply because we knew the distance between point A and point B) we are now rather tired of Sauchiehall Street, it provides some great vistas:

This was a little north of Sauchiehall actually, but the hot chocolate is worth the fib.

Boy oh boy do I ever like old buildings. Scotland is the place for them.

And as you walk down Sauchiehall, much of which is pedestrian-only, you’ll get to a big mall; turn right from there and you’re on Buchanan, another pedestrian-only open-air market with more great views:

The hill isn’t bad the first five times, but it can get pretty tiring on the next five.

We cut through the Queen Street train station and went to check out the cathedral. Back in the day, the difference between a city and a town in the United Kingdom was whether or not the place had a cathedral – if it did, it was a city. Without one it would never be more than a town.

Nowadays, the title of “city” is bestowed by the Queen, but most of the older cities in the country still have beautiful old cathedrals, remnants of that historical distinction.

“This renovation project is ruining my pictures” was definitely not said by me. Twice.

And, as a guidebook I picked up says, what’s a cathedral without a cemetary? The Glasgow Necropolis is huge and beautiful, but I wasn’t up for the steep climb to the top just yet. The front gates are mid-19th century, though, and we could spot some neat things just on the way in:

I need a cool gate for MY Necropoli— wait.

I love statues even more than I love old buildings, but I’ll leave most of my statue photos off this page. There were a lot of them.

And, since I am very (very!) tired and feeling bed beckoning to me, I’ll stick a few more photos here to get you through until my next ‘blog post… probably tomorrow night. Tomorrow we’ll be travelling to Inverness, which we intend to set up as “home base” for a couple weeks while we do our best to make up the mileage that we’ve lost.

Enjoy the photos, folks, and remember to get the word out there and donate what you can. Cheers!

Are government buildings everywhere so majestic? Even Toronto has nice buildings for governance.

On our now-over-familiar George Square, this building was covered in statues. The perfect building?

Another victim of Glasgow’s infamous weather.

There are churches everywhere in Glasgow, unsurprisingly. They are all beautiful.

I love lions. Glasgow has two gigantic white ones!

Of course, it wouldn’t be the UK for nerds without…

Allons-y!

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