human choroinic gonadotropin
10
Oct

Trial Run

   Posted by: admin   in Training

Last night at about six thirty, I had an epiphany.

It was long-since dark, and I was walking along a stretch of Lawrence Avenue, a street that runs from one side of Toronto to another with a few minor interruptions. The snow that had blustered in that morning had turned to rain in the afternoon, coming down in a steady, light fall that was almost mist at times.

I had decided to walk long before I knew about the weather, but with my sweater’s hood up and my long, ankle-length coat done up fast against the rain, I was comfortable enough. My hands stayed in my pockets as I watched the traffic splash through the street, idly thinking about the trip I was, ostensibly, training for even then.

It wasn’t until about halfway through my four-kilometre walk that I looked at my phone, curious. My Weather Network app opened quickly and confirmed what I had thought: that very weather was the worst I was told to expect in Scotland. One degree Celsius. Rain.

And it wasn’t that bad. It wasn’t great, of course; my socks were damp despite my weatherproofed boots, and it was chilly. But I wore layers – fewer layers than we’ll have available to us in Scotland, no less – and wasn’t uncomfortable at all. My hood was keeping my head from getting wet, something I know makes me uncomfortable after a while. A pair of gloves was all I really wanted – and I added that to my phone’s simple list of things to bring with us to Scotland. Walking for four kilometres in that weather was no worse than walking it in any other non-perfect weather, and a fair bit better than walking it in the too-hot, sun-burning weather that I trained in all summer.

We’re coming for you, land of William Wallace and dreary skies. And we’ll be ready.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 at 10:47 am and is filed under Training. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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