human choroinic gonadotropin
10
Oct

These Shoes Were Made For Walkin’

   Posted by: admin   in Research

Last week I realized that I needed new shoes.

My running shoes I got very gently-used second-hand back in August. They lasted a surprisingly long time – the extra weight on my frame tends to wreak havoc on my poor footwear and it almost never lasts this long. They’re even still good, if slowly degrading; I can feel my feet aching a little more on longer walks than they used to, and on one of my long walks in July I hurt the arch of my right foot.

Looking through dozens of articles on marathon running and walking online in the days leading up to a Payless sale that Andrew told me about, I found some great points that I thought it would be relevant to share here.

First and foremost, how a shoe is actually supposed to fit. Half an inch of room in the toe. Snug enough that the heel doesn’t slide around and cause blisters. Things that I knew on some level but didn’t pay enough conscious attention to when shoe-shopping before.

I also learned that walking shoes and running shoes are made differently. Walking shoes have softer heels, usually even curved upwards, because walking is a very different motion than running and you usually step down on your heel first, unlike in running where the balls of your feet are the highest-impact areas.

But the thing that made the most impact (ba-dum ching!) was a simple number that I read on several websites: that the lifespan of a pair of good shoes tends to be between 300 and 500 miles of walking. They’ll stay together after that, but that’s when they start degrading.

To me that’s a hell of a sign. But it also means that the shoes I bought last week will only last me about half of the year between now and the Quest, and that’s if I don’t walk quite as much as I want to… but I’m going to keep a tally of how many kilometres I walk in this pair and see how it goes.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, October 10th, 2017 at 10:41 am and is filed under Research. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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